Letters Media and suicide

Papageno v Werther effect

BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c5841 (Published 19 October 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c5841
  1. Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, assistant professor1,
  2. Martin Voracek, associate professor2,
  3. Arno Herberth, postgraduate researcher1,
  4. Benedikt Till, postdoctoral researcher1,
  5. Markus Strauss, research assistant1,
  6. Elmar Etzersdorfer, associate professor1,
  7. Brigitte Eisenwort, associate professor1,
  8. Gernot Sonneck, full professor1
  1. 1Department of Medical Psychology, Centre for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
  2. 2Department of Basic Psychological Research, School of Psychology, University of Vienna, A-1010 Vienna, Austria
  1. thomas.niederkrotenthaler{at}meduniwien.ac.at

Sensationalist media reports, as in Hong Kong’s print media,1 can trigger further suicides—the Werther effect.2 However, we recently found that the effects of suicide related news stories was broad and sometimes protective, depending on the contents of the story.3 …

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