Intended for healthcare professionals

Editorials

Monitoring HPV vaccination programmes

BMJ 2010; 340 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c1666 (Published 24 March 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1666

HPV vaccination program: post marketting surveillane and next step

Editor,

I read the editorial by Canfell and agree that although there is no
present evidence that the new HPV vaccine can increase the risk for
pregnancy the post marketting surveillane of the vaccine for this specific
possible adverse effect and others, similar to any new drugs, is required.
Indeed, since the HPV vaccine is not a pandemic vaccine, the long term pre
-registration assessment should already confirmed for the safety of
vaccine.

Indeed, the efficacy of HPV vaccination during pregnancy is
interesting. The topic concerns not only safety but also effectiveness. A
new report from a study group in USA also found that "vaccination prior to
pregnancy is unlikely to be efficacious in preventing vertical
transmission [2]."

There are some cencerns for the future using of HPV vaccine after the
post implementation assessment data is derived. The reanalysis of cost-
benefit of this new vaccination should be done. Risk and benefit have to
be weighted for making decision.

References

1. Canfell K. Monitoring HPV vaccination programmes
BMJ 2010; 340: c1666.

2. Smith EM, Parker MA, Rubenstein LM, Haugen TH, Hamsikova E, Turek LP.
Evidence for vertical transmission of HPV from mothers to infants. Infect
Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2010;2010:326369.

Competing interests:
None declared

Competing interests: No competing interests

29 March 2010
professor viroj wiwanitkit
physician, biomedical researcher
wiwanitkit house, bangkhae, bangkok thailand 10160