Intended for healthcare professionals

Rapid response to:

Clinical Review

Diagnosis and management of gout

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7553.1315 (Published 01 June 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:1315

Rapid Response:

Me and My Gout

Two decades ago, after a prolonged intercontinental flight where at
every meal I helped myself to the free wine, I developed my first attack
of gout.The left big toe was acutely inflamed.Stayed home for a fortnight
till it subsided. Blood reports were unremarkable. Colchicene was
taken.Drank plenty of water.Read lot about food items that can initiate or
exacerbate the misery.
Subsequently, every 12 - 18 months I would be bed ridden with an attack of
gout.It was the same process. Always it was the left big toe. I would hop
around the house with the help of crutches.
During a casual conversation a Rheumatology colleague informed that if at
the first hint of a pain in the big toe, an NSAID is swallowed, the attack
could be aborted. I followed his advice. A miracle it was! No gout attacks
since then, which is 36 months. The NSAID of my choice was Naproxen sodium
220 mgs.- just one oral dose when pain initiates.
I still enjoy an occasional glass of wine.The seventieth birthday was few
months ago. The pair of crutches are collecting dust in the garage.
Why is that gout always visits my left big toe?

Competing interests:
None declared

Competing interests: No competing interests

12 June 2006
A.A.W. Amarasinghe,MD,
Consultant Psychiatrist
102 Bayberry Hills, McDonough, Georgia 30253 USA