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Rapid response to:

Papers

Birth characteristics of women who develop gestational diabetes: population based study

BMJ 2000; 321 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.321.7260.546 (Published 02 September 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;321:546

Rapid Response:

What about 'nutrition' and gestational diabetes?

Editor.
As Egelend et al(1) may be providing improved screening programmes for
gestational diabetes we would agree with Leistikow's(2) letter on smoking,
and would add that passive smoking be also included along with poor
nutrition.

Improved screening programmes for gestational diabetes should include
a nutritional profile and relevant blood investigations that must include
micronutrient status as a priority. Our ongoing prospective cohort study
into birth outcomes indicates that compromised nutritional profiles may be
important not only during pregnancy but more importantly some time prior
to women becoming pregnant(unpublished data). Paternal nutrition may also
play a significant role.

Finally, we would point out that health problems like gestational
diabetes would need to include poor nutrition as the most important risk
factor.

Human beings are an undetachable part of 'nature'; where proper
healthy growth requires balanced nutrition. It is nutrition that drives
the genes and not vice versa.

'The same mindset that draws the cigarette, puts poor food choices
into the same mouth'

1)Egeland GM et al.Birth characteristics of women who develop
gestational diabetes: population based study
BMJ 2000; 321: 546-547

2)Leistikow BN. Smoking may cause familial gestational diabetes and
low birtweight bmj.com, 31 Aug 2000

Competing interests: No competing interests

07 September 2000
L Vitetta
Director of Research; Research Associates; Head of School
L Mrazek, J Altermatt, A Sali
Graduate School of Medicine, Swinburne University