Intended for healthcare professionals

Rapid response to:

Education And Debate

Does animal experimentation inform human healthcare? Observations from a systematic review of international animal experiments on fluid resuscitation

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7335.474 (Published 23 February 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:474

Rapid Response:

Animal Experiments do not inform on human healthcare

In reply to the article ‘Does animal experimentation inform human
healthcare’ (BMJ 23 February Pp474-476) I would like to make the following
points.

How can we predict from animal experiments? Are we like mice or rats
(which often react in opposite ways to each other)? Are we more like dogs
or rabbits? Regardless of whether the rats die or the dogs thrive it is
always the first human volunteers to take the new drug/treatment who are
the real guinea pigs.

The problem of species differences was dramatically demonstrated when
the government recently discovered (2001) that cow brains had been used
for ‘BSE in sheep’ research, instead of sheep brains. The research was
dismissed as the wrong species had been used.

For over 200 years animals have been used in cancer research yet
there are more cancers now than ever before with 1 in 3 people affected.
There is also a modern epidemic of asthma, allergies, AIDS, Alzeimers,
autism, diabetes, ME and degenerative diseases.
Suspicion falls on the obsession with (usually animal tested) synthetic
chemical based drugs, vaccines, cosmetics, food additives, pesticides and
other synthetic environmental toxins.
The ‘pill for every ill’ culture has failed miserably and the NHS cannot
cope with the resulting tide of illness.

In 1998 a survey found adverse drug reactions to be 4th in the list
of causes of death – after heart attacks, cancers and strokes (1).

Only when researchers use proper human based science can we have
confidence that we are doing our utmost to ease human suffering from
disease.

Yours sincerely

Gillian D Russell DCR


Retired Neuro-radiographer. Medical Consultant’s wife

(1) Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) 14/4/98

Competing interests: No competing interests

25 February 2002
Gillian D Russell
Retired Neuroradiographer. Consultant's wife
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