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Rapid response to:

Research Special Paper

Publishers’ and journals’ instructions to authors on use of generative artificial intelligence in academic and scientific publishing: bibliometric analysis

BMJ 2024; 384 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj-2023-077192 (Published 31 January 2024) Cite this as: BMJ 2024;384:e077192

Linked Editorial

Use of generative artificial intelligence in medical research

Rapid Response:

RE: Re: Publishers’ and journals’ instructions to authors on use of generative artificial intelligence in academic and scientific publishing: bibliometric analysis

Dear Editor

We thank Liu et al. for their comment [1] on our study, which reports the results of a bibliometric analysis examining the presence of authors' guidelines related to the use of generative artificial intelligence (GAI) in academia.

Our paper discusses the initial step of a broader effort to develop uniform guidelines for GAI use in research and writing, highlighting the inconsistency in current recommendations across publishing entities, possibly leading to confusion and misuse of GAI-tools like ChatGPT in academia [2].

In their comment [1] Liu et al have correctly and timely highlighted the necessity for common-shared guidelines to solve this issue.

To this end, seven months ago, we established the "ChatGPT and Generative Artificial Intelligence Natural Large Language Models for Accountable Reporting and Use" (CANGARU) project [3-4]. This global, cross-disciplinary project seeks to develop a universally inclusive set of consensus guidelines for the academic use of generative AI, leveraging the Delphi Consensus model. It has garnered the participation of over 3,000 academics from diverse fields worldwide, making it, to our knowledge, one of the largest and most inclusive Delphi consensus efforts in academia. Our initiative stands out for its commitment to representation, welcoming contributors from all academic disciplines without bias towards gender, race and ethnicity, or geographic location.

The Steering Committee is constituted by the Editors-in-Chief and members from the Editorial Boards of preeminent academic journals, in conjunction with representatives from regulatory agencies, publishing entities, and experts dedicated to the formulation of artificial intelligence governance frameworks and guidelines.

Further details about this global, cross-disciplinary initiative can be found in our paper protocol [5], underlining the project's scope and its response to the guideline inconsistency issue regarding the ethical guidelines of this technology that our BMJ article highlighted.

We are eager to share the results of the CANGARU initiative [3-5] and appreciate the support from academics and scientists around the world in this effort to protect the future of academia by ensuring the ethical and proper use of GAI going forward.

References

1 - https://www.bmj.com/content/384/bmj-2023-077192/rapid-responses (access March 6, 2024)
2 - Ganjavi, Conner, Michael B. Eppler, Asli Pekcan, Brett Biedermann, Andre Abreu, Gary S. Collins, Inderbir S. Gill, and Giovanni E. Cacciamani. "Publishers’ and journals’ instructions to authors on use of generative artificial intelligence in academic and scientific publishing: bibliometric analysis." bmj 384 (2024).
3 - https://www.equator-network.org/library/reporting-guidelines-under-devel... (access March 6, 2024)
4- Cacciamani, Giovanni E., Inderbir S. Gill, and Gary S. Collins. "ChatGPT: standard reporting guidelines for responsible use." Nature 618, no. 7964 (2023): 238-238.
5- Cacciamani, Giovanni E., Michael B. Eppler, Conner Ganjavi, Asli Pekan, Brett Biedermann, Gary S. Collins, and Inderbir S. Gill. "Development of the ChatGPT, generative artificial intelligence and natural large language models for accountable reporting and use (CANGARU) guidelines." arXiv preprint arXiv:2307.08974 (2023).

Competing interests: No competing interests

06 March 2024
Giovanni Cacciamani
Associate Professor of Urology and Radiology Research
Conner Ganjavi, medical student, Michael B Eppler, medical student, Asli Pekcan, medical student, Brett Biedermann, medical student, Andre Abreu, professor of urology, Gary S Collins, professor of medical statistics, Inderbir S Gill, professor of urology
1Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA 2USC Institute of Urology and Catherine and Joseph Aresty Department of Urology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA 3Artificial Intelligence Center at USC Urology, USC Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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