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Adherence to the test, trace, and isolate system in the UK: results from 37 nationally representative surveys

BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n608 (Published 31 March 2021) Cite this as: BMJ 2021;372:n608

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Test, trace, and isolate in the UK

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Re: Adherence to the test, trace, and isolate system in the UK: results from 37 nationally representative surveys

Dear Editor,
The difference between what everyone knows is required and what happens was interesting: the notable dip at Christmas would appear to show that for a significant enough size of tranche to have affected the graph, seasonal partying over-rides health concerns.

In the light of this research showing blatant disrespect for requirements when symptomatic, it would be surely even more interesting to know how many adhere to self-isolating as instructed when notified they need to as a precaution as one of their close contacts has tested positive. I'm thinking especially about school youngsters.

It's all very well to have a theoretical strategy if only on the basis of needing to start somewhere, but if it doesn't work in practice then either a way needs to be found to force the issue or more realistically a different strategy needs to be implemented PDQ.

This surely begs the question as to whether all the schools LFT's are worth the cost and fuss when first they only pick up 50% of the positives, and second such a low percentage of close contacts I suspect will properly self-isolate given this research has shown so few self-isolate even with symptoms.

Competing interests: No competing interests

02 April 2021
David Meacock
Classical Musician
Bucks