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Vaccinating against covid-19 in people who report allergies

BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n120 (Published 18 January 2021) Cite this as: BMJ 2021;372:n120

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Re: Vaccinating against covid-19 in people who report allergies

Dear Editor,

The editorial on "Vaccinating against covid-19 in people who report allergies" gives an interesting point for discussion on current clinical practice. A simple question is whether it is necessary to try to vaccinate a person who has history of allergy or any other risk. Regarding new COVID-19, the severe adverse effect in a person with a history of allergy is common and can also be seen with other vaccines that are not currently used in US (such as the latest report on adverse reactiion to Sinovac in a person with a history of allergy to penicillin according to the public report from Thailand).

There is usually a lack of data on a new vaccine, therefore, we might select to vaccinate the most healthy group first. We might try to use a pre-vaccination questionnaire or skin test to screen for risk but risk is still a risk and it might be a question that we follow the standard principle "first do no harm".

Conflict of interest
none

References
1. Vaccinating against covid-19 in people who report allergies. BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n120

Competing interests: No competing interests

03 March 2021
Viroj Wiwanitkitt
medical professor
Dr DY Patil University, Pune, India