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Quality of dietary fat and genetic risk of type 2 diabetes: individual participant data meta-analysis

BMJ 2019; 366 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l4292 (Published 25 July 2019) Cite this as: BMJ 2019;366:l4292

Rapid Response:

Re: Quality of dietary fat and genetic risk of type 2 diabetes: individual participant data meta-analysis

In relation to the healthy population, diabetic people have an increased risk of suffering from atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases or accidents, which will be even greater if other cardiovascular risk factors are associated, such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia or arterial hypertension. In addition, the accumulation of abdominal fat is especially dangerous for this type of patients. Consequently, in addition to losing the extra kilos and maintaining a normal weight, special attention should be paid to the type of food that is eaten, especially as regards its fat content.

Fats are the body's energy reserve, which it uses when carbohydrate reserves have been depleted. But each gram of fat that is ingested assumes 9 calories, double what proteins or carbohydrates provide. In addition, it is necessary to differentiate between the different types of fat (saturated or unsaturated), since some of them, in inadequate amounts, are harmful to health by providing cholesterol; while others, as is the case with oleic acid contained in olive oil, protect against the development of atherosclerosis.

Taking this into account, fats should not exceed 30% of the calories contributed by the diet, given that saturated fats should be less than 10% and a daily intake of 300 grams of cholesterol should not be exceeded.

Therefore, diabetic patients must have accurate information on the content and type of fat of different foods in order to balance their diet healthily.

Competing interests: No competing interests

07 August 2019
Andres David Avila
Student
Surcolombian University
andres0104@outlook.com