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Editorials

Surveys indicate a decline in sex among young adults in Britain

BMJ 2019; 365 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l1961 (Published 07 May 2019) Cite this as: BMJ 2019;365:l1961

Linked research

Changes in, and factors associated with, frequency of sex in Britain

Linked Opinion

Let’s talk about sex

A collapsing population spells disaster

Mark Craig [1] cannot have thought this through: an age heavy, collapsing population is not a humanitarian prospect, and unlikely to be good for political stability either. Our schools already have an unprecedented burden of disability and mental ill health [2,3,4] which will surely have significantly contributed to Wellings et al's data [5,6]. This is not to advocate unrestrained population growth, but a sustainable population might still be a good idea.

[1] Mark F Craig, 'Re: Surveys indicate a decline in sex among young adults in Britain', 11 May 2019, https://www.bmj.com/content/365/bmj.l1961/rr

[2] Rapid Responses for Viner, 'NHS must prioritise health of children and young people', https://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.k1116/rapid-responses

[3] John Stone/CMO Correspondence, https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/536265/response/1323604/attach/2/...

[4] Oliver Newlan, 'Antidepressant prescriptions for children on the rise', BBC News 24 July 2018, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-44821886

[5] Wellings et al, 'Changes in, and factors associated with, frequency of sex in Britain: evidence from three National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal)',
BMJ 2019; 365 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l1525 (Published 07 May 2019)

[6] Leusink, P, ' Surveys indicate a decline in sex among young adults in Britain',
BMJ 2019; 365 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l1961 (Published 07 May 2019)
Cite this as: BMJ 2019;365:l1961

Competing interests: No competing interests

13 May 2019
John Stone
UK Editor
London N22