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Research

Effect of breakfast on weight and energy intake: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

BMJ 2019; 364 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l42 (Published 30 January 2019) Cite this as: BMJ 2019;364:l42
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Visual summary available

A GOfER diagram (Graphical Overview for Evidence Reviews) showing a visual summary of the included trials from this review.

Opinion

Breakfast—the most important meal of the day?

Rapid Response:

Re: Effect of breakfast on weight and energy intake: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

It is not really what you call it but when you eat it.

Intermittent fasting is used by many different peoples: some by design and others by need, but it is said to mimic the eating patterns of our ancestors prior to organized agriculture. In doing so we tend to exercise or work on an empty stomach which aids utilization of stored energy. Many call this diet LCHF; Paleo or Primitive but it seemed to sustain many hunter gatherers for thousands of years such that they seemed to have plenty of leisure time and good health.

Many like me only eat within an eight hours window, mine from midday to 8 pm but any that suits one's lifestyle. As a dedicated Low Carb/High Fat eater for some ten years it sustains me and I rarely feel hungry. I often eat 'brunch' (at lunch time) or occasionally, when travelling, will eat a late cooked breakfast and then dinner about 7 pm. My weight hovers around 67kgs all of the time, give or take a half a kilo either way and has done for ten years.

Breakfast is today more a sales opportunity for Big Food, helped by all of the Institutions of the State, who have colluded to the detriment of the health of our peoples, especially our children, to promote foodstuffs that were never meant to be eaten by humans. And not just breakfast cereals but manufactured fats/oils; milk from nuts (sic); so called 'smoothies' with more fruit than you would likely eat in natural form in a week, providing a fructose load that (with other sugar laden 'healthy' drinks), is contributing to the growth of NAFLD.

Competing interests: No competing interests

04 February 2019
Ernest T Berry
Security Systems Engineer and Consultant. Human Biologist and Biochemist (failed).Patient Reviewer.
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Nottingham