Intended for healthcare professionals

Letters Sex based differences in trials

Sex can affect participation, engagement, and adherence in trials

BMJ 2016; 355 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i6754 (Published 30 December 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;355:i6754
  1. Alison Avenell, clinical chair in health services research1,
  2. Clare Robertson, research fellow1,
  3. Fiona Stewart, research fellow1,
  4. Dwayne Boyers, research fellow2,
  5. Flora Douglas, lecturer in public health3,
  6. Daryll Archibald, research fellow4,
  7. Edwin van Teijlingen, professor of reproductive health research5,
  8. Pat Hoddinott, chair in primary care6,
  9. Charles Boachie, statistician7
  1. 1Health Services Research Unit, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK
  2. 2Health Services Research Unit and Health Economics Research Unit, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK
  3. 3Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Medicine, Medical Science and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK
  4. 4Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy (SCPHRP), Centre for Population Health Sciences (CPHS), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9DX, UK
  5. 5Centre for Midwifery, Maternal and Perinatal Health, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth House, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth BU1 3LH, UK
  6. 6NMAHP Research Unit, Unit 13, Scion House, Stirling University Innovation Park, Stirling FK9 4NF, UK
  7. 7Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 9QQ, UK
  1. a.avenell{at}abdn.ac.uk

We enjoyed Wallach and colleagues’ analysis of sex based subgroup differences in randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Library.1 The authors found little evidence for clinically relevant sex-treatment interactions for outcomes.

Not apparent in their analysis are the social, psychological, and contextual factors that can influence men’s and women’s …

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