Intended for healthcare professionals

Analysis

An open letter to The BMJ editors on qualitative research

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i563 (Published 10 February 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;352:i563

Re: An open letter to The BMJ editors on qualitative research

Although not one of the 83 signatories collected by Professor Greenhalgh, I strongly support her plea for a change of editorial policy.

I am a fully committed quantitative researcher (one of the top 3 most cited Parkinson's disease researchers in the world and on the recent list produced by Thomson Reuter of the World's Most Scientific Minds).

You cannot judge qualitative research and thoughtful articles by impact factor (a broken and horribly flawed method of assessment that I learned a lot about from a series of BMJ articles more than ten years ago). Case reports and thoughtful articles on medical practice should be part and parcel of The BMJ's editorial policy as it was with such success for so many years.

Competing interests: No competing interests

22 February 2016
Andrew Lees
Professor of Neurology
Reta Lila Weston Institute for Neuro Studies, 1 Wakefield Street London WC1