Intended for healthcare professionals

Rapid response to:

Feature Feature

The bias busters

BMJ 2014; 349 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g4748 (Published 23 July 2014) Cite this as: BMJ 2014;349:g4748

Rapid Response:

METRICS (Meta-Research Innovation Center) by Stanford’s School of Medicine is commendable in its conception and design.1 The ‘Meta-Research’ as it is about to work upon is the need of the hour and certainly an idea whose time has come.2 The proper way and right methodology is never taught in most of institutes, especially in developing countries, where a lot of research has questionable undercurrents and several shortcomings.

The observation in the feature article is right in pointing out that lack of knowledge is key to most of the problem. Wastage of so many man-hours and creative endeavour into suboptimal findings with little impact on the greater common good is futile. Besides, the lure of getting published early involves shortcuts to avoid a rightful methodology that is quite labour intensive. The other big question is more moral than academic – who is responsible for the consent, compliance and faith of the study subjects that has been misused and manipulated and which is no less a crime?

I hope the project is a step in right direction and gathers international co-operation for reaching its objectives in a positive way.

References –
1. Yamey Gavin.The bias busters .BMJ 2014;349:g4748
2. METRICS–Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford. http://med.stanford.edu/metrics.

Competing interests: No competing interests

31 July 2014
Ganesh S. Dharmshaktu
Orthopaedic Surgeon
Government Medical College, Haldwani
c/o Dr Y.P.S.Pangety, Ganga Vihar , Malli Bamori, Haldwani. Uttarakhand