Intended for healthcare professionals

CCBYNC Open access
Research

Effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine for the prevention of cervical abnormalities: case-control study nested within a population based screening programme in Australia

BMJ 2014; 348 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g1458 (Published 04 March 2014) Cite this as: BMJ 2014;348:g1458

Re: Effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine for the prevention of cervical abnormalities: case-control study nested within a population based screening programme in Australia

I would ask of madam Elizabeth Crowe and her colleagues why the catch-up round in 2007 to 2009 was limited to school-going girls (12-17 yrs) and women in the community (18-26yrs) only. Though these constitute teenage and young women, other women (>26 yrs) are also sexually active and hence would not be either free of HPV (HPV infection is nearly universal and can occur in women who had sex even once) or if free of these 4 types (6,11, 16 and 18) are equally vulnerable to contract them. Moreover, the old misgiving is that men are equally susceptible and can have consequences of infection, including spread of infection, so why not vaccinate men also to protect them from these 4 types.

Competing interests: No competing interests

08 March 2014
Neeru Gupta
Scientist E
Indian Council of Medical Research
Ansari Nagar, New Delhi-110029