Intended for healthcare professionals

CCBYNC Open access

Rapid response to:

Research

Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

BMJ 2013; 347 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f4305 (Published 31 July 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f4305

Rapid Response:

Re: Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

The publication of the ROSSINI trial is a landmark in the short history of trainee-led research networks in the UK. The trainee-led West Midlands Research Collaborative (WMRC), with the support of experienced senior clinicians and researchers, designed and managed all aspects of the ROSSINI trial from the outset to its conclusion, while trainees were responsible for driving recruitment in the 21 participating sites. The end result was a well-conducted trial which managed to complete recruitment ahead of schedule. We would like to congratulate the trial investigators and the WMRC for this remarkable achievement [1].

Trainee involvement in research is not a new phenomenon. However, never before have we witnessed trainees working together across the UK in delivering high-quality clinical research. Such an approach has multiple benefits for clinical research studies, trainees and ultimately the patients [2].

We believe that the ROSSINI trial together with the recently published multi-centre prospective study of emergency appendicectomy (led by the National General Surgical Research Collaborative) have firmly established the feasibility of trainee collaborative research networks, as well as the key role they have to play in terms of undertaking high-quality clinical research [3].

Following the example set by the WMRC, networks for trainees in neurosurgery, paediatric surgery, plastic surgery, trauma and orthopaedics, ENT surgery, urology and cardiothoracic surgery are currently being established.

The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC), which is an initiative of the British Neurosurgical Trainee Association (BNTA), was formed in April 2012. In just 12 months since its inception, the BNTRC held a launch meeting which was attended by trainees from 21 different neurosurgical units, secured start-up research funding (grant awarded by the Society of British Neurological Surgeons), and launched its first prospective, UK-wide, trainee-led, protocol-driven, observational cohort study [2]. Two randomised multi-centre trials and a further prospective cohort study are currently in development.

We are confident that the establishment of trainee networks together with the developing surgical research infrastructure, which is supported by the Royal College of Surgeons of England and partner organisations, will ensure a bright future for clinical research in surgery.

1. Pinkney TD, Calvert M, Bartlett DC, Gheorghe A, Redman V, Dowswell G et al. Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial). BMJ 2013;347:f4305

2. Kolias AG, Jones TL, Cowie CJ, Coulter IC, Afshari FT, Tarnaris A et al. A report from the inaugural meeting of the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative held in the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 19 October 2012. Br J Neurosurg 2013;27:307-10.

3. National Surgical Research Collaborative. Multicentre observational study of performance variation in provision and outcome of emergency appendicectomy. Br J Surg 2013;100:1240-52.

Competing interests: No competing interests

02 August 2013
Angelos G Kolias
Neurosurgical Registrar
Christopher J Cowie, Andrew Tarnaris, Peter J Hutchinson, Paul M Brennan on behalf of the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative
British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative
35 - 43 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, WC2A 3PE