Intended for healthcare professionals

CCBYNC Open access
Research

Venous thrombosis in users of non-oral hormonal contraception: follow-up study, Denmark 2001-10

BMJ 2012; 344 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2990 (Published 10 May 2012) Cite this as: BMJ 2012;344:e2990

Re: Venous thrombosis in users of non-oral hormonal contraception: follow-up study, Denmark 2001-10

I agree with Drs Szarewski and Mansour that this study is concerning. These results will be picked up by commissioners and prescribing advisors who will then make decisions about restricting the use of these highly effective, popular contraceptives based on a poor evidence base.

We have done well nationally with reductions in teen pregnancy and abortions over the past few years. Good open access to a range of options has allowed women to make an informed choice of contraceptive method. By having a choice they are more likely to comply with the requirements of their chosen method which maximises efficacy and reduces the numbers of unplanned and unwanted pregnancy.

The report a few weeks ago by the Advisory Group on Contraception http://cleregolfserver.co.uk/bayer/sex-lives-and-commissioning/index.html clearly identified that there is a higher abortion rate in areas where limited access or prescribing restrictions are in place.

If commissioners and prescribing advisors make knee-jerk decisions based on poor studies such as this one we will be reduced to providing a range of cheaper, older, less well tolerated options to women and we are likely to see unplanned pregnancy rates increasing again.

Competing interests: Received honoraria, consultancy fees and conference sponsorship from Bayer Schering and MSD

18 May 2012
Anne L Connolly
GPSI gynaecology
The Ridge Medical Practice
Cousen Road, Bradford