Intended for healthcare professionals

Student Careers

Get yourself connected

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/sbmj.0506247 (Published 01 June 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:0506247
  1. Ruth Chambers, clinical dean and general practitioner1
  1. 1Staffordshire University

“I'm all right thank you; I can manage quite well by myself.” Is that you? Is that you keeping yourself and your dilemmas to yourself? As Ruth Chambers ;explains, you need a mentor

A mentor could help you at any stage in your career. Sure, you can manage without, but a mentor could help to guide you and challenge you about your career. The increasing pressures in the NHS mean that it's vital to find new ways of coping and thriving at work. A mentor could enable you to reflect on your current situation, your strengths and weaknesses, and your aspirations. They could help you to grow and develop in your career, not spoon feed or sponsor you, but help you to give yourself a push or find solutions to your career or personal issues. Box 1 describes the benefits for you.

Box 1: Why have a mentor?1

Mentoring

  1. Boosts your development: …

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