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Effectiveness of vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 among people with underlying chronic diseases: cohort study, Denmark, 2009-10

BMJ 2012; 344 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.d7901 (Published 25 January 2012) Cite this as: BMJ 2012;344:d7901

Re: Effectiveness of vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 among people with underlying chronic diseases: cohort study, Denmark, 2009-10

Dear Editors,

This detailed study provides solid evidence for not vaccinating high risk patients against influenza H1N1.

One thing is developing and measuring antibodies against influenza virus H1N1, and another thing is to actually obtain clinical benefit after vaccination.

Hundreds of thousands were vaccinated in this Danish study, but hospital admissions due to H1N1 influenza virus did not diminish!

There results come with some interesting legal consequences: no one can actually declare anymore that after vaccination the patient’s overall health is protected.

NHS Trusts, together with other European Health Ministries, will find it extremely difficult to dedicate hundreds of millions of pounds in extended vaccination programs that do not reduce hospitalizations of high risk patients!

Competing interests: No competing interests
05 February 2012
Stavros Saripanidis
Consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Private Surgery
Thessaloniki, Greece
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