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Stop bombarding public with offers of bigger portions, say campaigners

BMJ 2017; 358 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j4167 (Published 07 September 2017) Cite this as: BMJ 2017;358:j4167
  1. Jacqui Wise
  1. London

The average consumer is asked 106 times a year whether he or she would like to upgrade to a larger drink or meal, buy a supersize bar of chocolate at the checkout, or add an unhealthy side order or topping, a report has found.1

The report, from the Royal Society for Public Health and the weight loss organisation Slimming World, said that the “drip-drip effect” of this verbal upselling means that the average person consumes an additional 330 calories a week—17 000 extra calories a year—potentially leading to weight gain of 5 …

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