Research News

Individualised advice on type 2 diabetes is no better for changing behaviour, study finds

BMJ 2016; 355 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i6444 (Published 30 November 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;355:i6444
  1. Susan Mayor
  1. London

Giving healthy middle aged people individualised information based on their genetic risk of developing type 2 diabetes or their phenotypic factors such as body mass index has no greater effect on physical activity or other health behaviours than standard information about the condition, a UK randomised study has found.1

A growing number of direct-to-consumer genetic tests to calculate the risk of type 2 diabetes aim to motivate people to change their health related behaviour more than with standard lifestyle advice. But research evidence on the effect …

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