Minerva

Sweet shots for babies . . . and other stories

BMJ 2016; 355 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i5937 (Published 10 November 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;355:i5937

Give sugar, jab quickly

When performing painful procedures on newborn babies, international guidelines recommend giving sucrose and then waiting for two minutes. Dutch neonatologists decided to test whether this applied to the sick and premature infants in their intensive care unit (Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed doi:10.1136/archdischild-2016-310841). In part A of the study, 100 heelstick procedures were performed without any guidance on time interval. In part B, the medical team was instructed to adhere to a two minute time interval during 50 heelstick procedures. Using a validated pain score, they found that pain intensity was not correlated with the length of the time interval between sucrose being given and the heelstick procedure.

Don't blame me for the bad bugs

Questionnaires sent to Australian general practitioners showed that most of them would prescribe antibiotics for upper …

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