Letters Evidence for timing of childhood vaccines debate

The question should be whether the timing of vaccination optimises the impact on child health

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i1713 (Published 31 March 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;352:i1713
  1. Ane B Fisker, postdoctoral researcher
  1. Research Center for Vitamins and Vaccines (CVIVA), Bandim Health Project, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark, and Bandim Health Project, Guinea-Bissau Bandim Health Project, Guinea-Bissau
  1. a.fisker{at}bandim.org

Rather than asking whether there is evidence that the timing of the vaccination programme prevents the targeted diseases, the question should be whether the timing optimises the impact on child health.1

That evidence base is insufficient. In low income countries, where the burden of child mortality lies, the vaccines at the core of the Expanded Programme on Immunization were not evaluated for their …

View Full Text

Sign in

Log in through your institution

Free trial

Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
Sign up for a free trial

Subscribe