Research News

Female survivors of childhood cancer have good chance of motherhood, study finds

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i1704 (Published 23 March 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;352:i1704
  1. Ingrid Torjesen
  1. London

Modern chemotherapy regimens for childhood cancers have a greater effect on the future fertility of boys than on that of girls, a study published in the Lancet Oncology has found.1

Most women who have survived childhood cancer have a good chance of conceiving, particularly if they try for a child when they are young, the results showed. In contrast, male survivors of childhood cancer are significantly less likely to father children, especially if they were treated with chemotherapy regimens containing high doses of commonly used alkylating drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, procarbazine) and cisplatin.

US researchers followed up 10 938 male and female cancer survivors who had been treated with 14 commonly used chemotherapy drugs at 27 institutions across the United States and Canada from …

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