Analysis

Metformin as firstline treatment for type 2 diabetes: are we sure?

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h6748 (Published 08 January 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;352:h6748
  1. Rémy Boussageon, lecturer1,
  2. François Gueyffier, professor23,
  3. Catherine Cornu, clinical research physician234
  1. 1Department of General Practice, Faculty of Poitiers, 86000 Poitiers, France
  2. 2UMR 5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Claude Bernard University. CNRS, Lyon, France
  3. 3Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon University, Lyon, France
  4. 4INSERM Clinical Investigation Centre (CIC1407), Lyon, France
  1. Correspondence to: R Boussageon, 11 route du Clos Bardien, 79290 Saint Martin de Sanzay, France remy.boussageon2{at}wanadoo.fr
  • Accepted 19 November 2015

Abstract

Rémy Boussageon and colleagues ask whether metformin is bringing practical benefit to patients and question the focus on surrogate measures

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: We have read and understood BMJ policy on declaration of interests and have no relevant interests to declare.

  • Contributors and sources: This article is the result of joint discussions conducted by three authors on the effectiveness of antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes. RM is experienced in meta-analysis, especially in glucose lowering drugs. FG is experienced in pharmacology and evidence based medicine and has done several meta-analyses. CC is an endocrinologist and is experienced in meta-analysis. She is a former member of a health authority working group on glucose lowering drugs in type 2 diabetes. All authors contributed to study conceptualisation and design, data collection, and analysis. RM drafted the manuscript, which was revised by FG and CC. All authors approved the final manuscript.

  • Provenance and peer review: Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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