Letters Abolition of child poverty target

Doctors must advocate for action on the high levels of child poverty

BMJ 2015; 351 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h3959 (Published 29 July 2015) Cite this as: BMJ 2015;351:h3959
  1. David Taylor-Robinson, clinical senior lecturer in public health, honorary consultant in public health1,
  2. Sophie Wickham, research fellow1,
  3. Caoimhe McKenna, academic clinical fellow2,
  4. Rosie Kyeremateng, specialty registrar in community paediatrics3,
  5. Samuel Massion, research assistant1,
  6. Ben Barr, senior clinical lecturer in public health1
  1. 1Department of Public Health and Policy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L96 3GB, UK
  2. 2Population, Policy and Practice, Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK
  3. 3Peninsula Deanery, UK
  1. dctr{at}liv.ac.uk

Torjesen highlights the UK government’s decision to abolish its current target for assessing child poverty, a measure of material disadvantage that is based on relative and absolute income.1 The downgrading of the existing target comes before the budget’s big cut in tax credits, which will probably increase child poverty. Alongside ditching the Child …

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