Letters Physical activity for smoking cessation in pregnancy

Authors’ reply to Braillon and Bewley

BMJ 2015; 350 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h3555 (Published 30 June 2015) Cite this as: BMJ 2015;350:h3555
  1. Michael Ussher, professor of behavioural medicine1,
  2. Tim Coleman, professor of primary care2,
  3. Robert West, professor of health psychology3,
  4. Paul Aveyard, professor of behavioural medicine4,
  5. Sarah Lewis, professor of medical statistics5
  1. 1Population Health Research Institute, St George’s University of London, London SW17 0RE, UK
  2. 2Division of Primary Care and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
  3. 3Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK
  4. 4Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
  5. 5Division of Epidemiology and Public Health and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
  1. mussher{at}sgul.ac.uk

We agree that in principle nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) should help pregnant smokers to stop smoking and NRT is licensed for use in pregnancy in the UK.1 2 However, randomised controlled trials have not shown NRT to be effective for smoking cessation in pregnancy.3 This may be because of inadequate nicotine dosing owing to faster nicotine metabolism during pregnancy. Besides the lack of evidence for NRT, data on its harms for the fetus are …

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