Endgames Anatomy Quiz

Axial T2 weighted magnetic resonance image at the level of the lateral ventricles

BMJ 2015; 350 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h1609 (Published 25 March 2015) Cite this as: BMJ 2015;350:h1609
  1. Emily Skelton, advanced practitioner sonographer,
  2. David Howlett, consultant radiologist
  1. 1Eastbourne District General Hospital, Eastbourne BN21 2UD, UK
  1. Correspondence to: E Skelton e.skelton{at}nhs.net

Name the structures labelled A, B, C, D, and E in this axial T2 weighted magnetic resonance image at the level of the lateral ventricles. What is the clinical significance of the structure labelled E?

Answers

  • A: Genu of the corpus callosum

  • B: Splenium of the corpus callosum

  • C: Body of the right lateral ventricle

  • D: Body of the left lateral ventricle

  • E: Cavum septum pellucidum et vergae

The cavum septum pellucidum is a normal variant cerebrospinal fluid space between the leaflets of the septum pellucidum, which usually fuses by 3-6 months of age. It may persist and can occasionally extend posteriorly between the bodies of the lateral ventricles. This is known as the cavum septum pellucidum et vergae. The cavum septum pellucidum et vergae is an embryological remnant, thought to be present in only 1-15% of adults. In most cases, the discovery of a persistent cavum septum pellucidum et vergae is incidental, and if the walls of the cavum space are parallel (as above), the patient is usually asymptomatic. Occasionally, the cavum space may enlarge, causing the walls to take on a moderately convex outward margination. This bowing of the lateral walls can lead to intermittent obstructive hydrocephalus, headaches, and in extreme cases, loss of consciousness. Stereotactic cyst puncture, radical excision, and ventricular shunting may all be considered in the treatment of symptomatic cavum septum pellucidum et vergae.

Notes

Cite this as: BMJ 2015;350:h1609

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