Minerva

The side effects of statins and other stories . . .

BMJ 2014; 348 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g2574 (Published 09 April 2014) Cite this as: BMJ 2014;348:g2574

Bricolage is a term adapted by Levi-Strauss to describe the improvisation we use in the technological jungle of life. But my dear, this French anthropology is so last year and imperialistic: we should now call it “jugaad,” a Hindi slang word for getting by. To avoid causing disruption at Hampstead dinner parties, Minerva will stick to calling it “reverse innovation.” If you attend conferences about global health, you will hear a lot about this, and in an article collection in Globalization and Health (2014, www.globalizationandhealth.com/series/reverse_innovations) you can read a great deal more. To the dismay of corporations in the rich world, people in the poorer world are working out how to do high tech things in low tech ways. Maybe this is one of the means by which the whole world will achieve universal affordable healthcare, one day.

“Statins ‘have no side effects’” ran the front page headline in the Daily Telegraph about a paper that appeared in the European Journal …

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