Feature BMJ Awards 2014

Education team of the year: innovative approaches to support better care

BMJ 2014; 348 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g1990 (Published 27 March 2014) Cite this as: BMJ 2014;348:g1990

This article has a correction. Please see:

  1. Nigel Hawkes, freelance journalist
  1. 1London, UK
  1. nigel.hawkes1{at}btinternet.com

The BMJ award for education team recognises a project that shows outstanding innovation in educating UK healthcare professionals and improving performance. Nigel Hawkes meets the nominees

Teamwork, innovation, and the need to adapt to new methods of working underlie the six shortlisted projects competing for the Education Team title this year. They are united by a belief that better training leads to better outcomes and, implicitly, that medical education as normally practised leaves gaps that need to be filled.

University Hospital Bristol

At University Hospital Bristol everybody gets involved in undergraduate education. The aim, says co-team leader Phil McElnay, is to encourage teaching by every level of doctor from foundation years to consultants. Students in their third and fifth year of medical school are taught by near peers, F1 and F2 doctors who not long before were in the same position themselves. While the role of senior doctors in teaching is vital, much younger ones have something valuable to pass on too. “They share what they themselves have learnt in the wards,” McElnay says, “nitty gritty things you need to know. Involvement has been very good.”

The sessions are backed up by an electronic logging system called TLog in which the young mentors—and, more recently, the students—can record the sessions they have completed, together with a few reflections. Most people use the system, unlike the paper based logs that preceded it. “Every quarter we print out the results so that doctors can see what they’ve done and feel rewarded,” McElnay says. On a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is not very useful …

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