Research News

Intravenous vaccine shows promise against malaria

BMJ 2013; 347 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f5058 (Published 12 August 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f5058
  1. Ingrid Torjesen
  1. 1London

A vaccine consisting of a live but attenuated form of the most deadly malaria parasite has shown promising protective effects against malaria when given to people intravenously in early trials.

US researchers have reported in Science that the vaccine, which contains live sporozoites (SPZ) of the species Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) weakened through irradiation, protected 12 out of 15 patients from the disease, when given several times intravenously in high doses.1

The vaccine (PfSPZ) developed by biotechnology company Sanaria is unusual because it is injected intravenously and is based on the whole parasite. Most malaria vaccine candidates are recombinant subunit vaccines containing just a handful of parasite …

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