Letters Robotic surgery

Not everything that counts can be easily counted

BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f2461 (Published 24 April 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2461
  1. Hani J Marcus, clinical research fellow and specialty trainee neurosurgery12,
  2. Archie Hughes-Hallett, clinical research fellow1,
  3. Thomas P Cundy, clinical research fellow1,
  4. Dipankar Nandi, consultant neurosurgeon1,
  5. Guang-Zhong Yang, professor and co-director of the Hamlyn centre12,
  6. Ara Darzi, professor of surgery and co-director of the Hamlyn centre12
  1. 1Imperial College London, London W2 1NY, UK
  2. 2Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. hani.marcus10{at}imperial.ac.uk

Paul and colleagues highlight the need for national registries on robotic surgery to collect data on rare events, long term outcomes, and quality assurance more effectively.1 However, it would be hasty to draw conclusions on the comparative effectiveness of robotic versus traditional minimally invasive surgery on the basis of such information alone.

Robotic assistance is an adjunct to traditional minimally invasive …

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