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Risks of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes in women treated or not treated with mood stabilisers for bipolar disorder: population based cohort study

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e7085 (Published 08 November 2012) Cite this as: BMJ 2012;345:e7085

Re: Risks of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes in women treated or not treated with mood stabilisers for bipolar disorder: population based cohort study

Boden and colleagues finding of increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with bipolar depression, treated or not, suggests that fundamental causes of both are not being addressed.1

In my experience over the past 40 years the commonest reasons for “unexplained “ infertility and recurrent abortions and poor pregnancy outcomes are deficiencies in zinc, magnesium, copper, selenium, B vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids.2 These are also common reasons for mental illnesses and low zinc and high copper levels can contribute to postpartum depression.3 Antidepressant medications can change amine metabolism, e.g. mono amine oxidase inhibitors, but do not replete essential nutrient levels or correct copper/zinc imbalance. Nutritional deficiencies in both bipolar depression and adverse pregnancy outcomes need to be treated.

There is no good reason for failing to investigate and treat the whole patient and restore her cell chemistry to normal.

1 Boden R, Lungren M, Brabdt L, etal. Risks of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes in women treated or not treated with mood stabilisers for bipolar disorder: population based cohort study.BMJ2012;345:e7085

2 Grant ECG. Pregnancy or preconception care for both parents. BMJ 9 June 2012

3 Grant ECG. Postnatal depression and low zinc and high copper levels. BMJ 21 August 2008

Competing interests: No competing interests

12 November 2012
Ellen CG Grant
Physician and medical gynaecologistt
Retired
KT2 7JU
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