Prisons and health

Availability of junk food should be reduced

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e7070 (Published 24 October 2012)
Cite this as: BMJ 2012;345:e7070

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  1. Jonathan Tammam, research scientist1,
  2. Louise Gillam, former research assistant1,
  3. Bernard Gesch, senior research scientist1,
  4. John Stein, professor of neuroscience1
  1. 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, UK
  1. jonathan.tammam{at}dpag.ox.ac.uk

Prison inmates rely on two sources of food—main meals (provided by the prison) and items purchased from the canteen,1 2 the penal equivalent of a convenience store.

Prison meals meet nutritional guidelines, but purchased items—much of it “junk” food—may not.3We analysed macronutrient and energy content of food available in a canteen from …

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