GPs must try to help patients give up smokeless tobacco products to reduce oral cancer

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e6535 (Published 27 September 2012)
Cite this as: BMJ 2012;345:e6535

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  1. Ingrid Torjesen
  1. 1London

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has published final guidance for tackling the use of smokeless tobacco products, particularly in South Asian communities.

Smokeless tobacco products, such as paan, gutka, shupari, and betel quid, are often seen as healthy or beneficial within these communities but are associated with serious health and dental problems, including oral cancer, heart attack and stroke, and problems in pregnancy.

Use of smokeless tobacco products is considered the main reason why South Asian women are nearly four times more likely to develop oral cancers than women from other ethnic …

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