Guidance on collaboration with drug industry

Guidance offers little in the way of ethics or transparency

BMJ 2012; 344 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2910 (Published 24 April 2012)
Cite this as: BMJ 2012;344:e2910

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  1. Wendy Rogers, professor of clinical ethics1,
  2. Tamara Zutlevics, visiting scholar 2,
  3. Melissa Raven, adjunct lecturer2,
  4. Jon Jureidini, head3
  1. 1Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
  2. 2Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia
  3. 3Department of Psychological Medicine, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia
  1. wendy.rogers{at}mq.edu.au

While noting the alleged benefits of this new guidance, the article fails to mention its weaknesses.1 The guidance uncritically endorses relationships between the drug industry and healthcare professionals, a view endorsed by 18 august bodies including various royal colleges.

Despite claims of “ethics, transparency, partnership,” it takes some sleuthing to discover that the guideline is written by a multi-stakeholder group, seemingly coordinated and supported …

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