Letters A French king’s head

Authors’ reply

BMJ 2011; 342 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.d301 (Published 20 January 2011) Cite this as: BMJ 2011;342:d301
  1. Philippe Charlier, forensic medical examiner and osteo-archaeologist1,
  2. Jean-Pierre Babelon, historian (specialist in Henri IV)2,
  3. Bruno Galland, archivist-paleographist, historian, and scientific director3
  1. 1Department of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, University Hospital R Poincaré (AP-HP, UVSQ), Garches, France/Department of Medical Ethics, University of Paris 5, Paris, France
  2. 2Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres, Institut de France, 75006 Paris, France
  3. 3Archives Nationales, 75003 Paris, France
  1. ph_charlier{at}yahoo.fr

An osteo-archaeological identification must be based on both solid anthropological and historical data. Professor Fornaciari’s doubts can be easily assuaged.1

Hair characteristics, particularly the natural red and white colour of all the hairs studied, were confirmed by histology examination, avoiding any postmortem discoloration.

The left upper maxillary …

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