Letters Extracorporeal life support

ECMO patients overestimated

BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c6847 (Published 30 November 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c6847
  1. Andrew R Davies, intensivist1,
  2. Colin McArthur, director of intensive care2,
  3. Ian M Seppelt, intensivist 3,
  4. Steven A R Webb, intensivist 4
  1. 1Alfred Intensive Care Unit and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  2. 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
  3. 3Sydney Medical School—Nepean, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  4. 4School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
  1. a.davies{at}alfred.org.au

We wish to point out a misinterpretation of our results in an otherwise useful review of extracorporeal life support.1 The authors suggested that a third of patients admitted to intensive care with severe respiratory failure during the recent H1N1 influenza A pandemic needed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). …

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