Feature Christmas 2010: Research

Can he fix it? Yes, he can!

BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c6645 (Published 08 December 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c6645
  1. Kelly Weston, OST21,
  2. Kate Bush, OST42,
  3. Farid Afshar, specialist registrar3,
  4. Steven Rowley, consultant ophthalmologist2
  1. 1Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester SO22 5DG, UK
  2. 2Royal Bournemouth Hospital, Bournemouth, UK
  3. 3Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK
  1. weston.dr{at}gmail.com

We present a case in which a novel treatment was instigated by the patient to control symptoms of ocular neuromyotonia

Case report

A 68 year old woman presented with intermittent diplopia lasting a few minutes precipitated by left gaze. Best corrected visual acuities were 6/9 right and 6/36 left. Initial examination showed only a dense left cataract, which was removed, improving vision to 6/9. Unfortunately her symptoms continued. Her diplopia was elicited during orthoptic review, showing a left exotropia, with updrift, measuring 40 prism dioptres. There was limitation of adduction and depression of the left eye. Imaging showed no …

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