BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c5765 (Published 19 October 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c5765

Babies with asymmetrical heads (plagiocephaly) are conventionally treated with “active repositioning” or by wearing orthotic helmets, and the evidence to date has not pointed to either of the methods as superior. An analysis of three-dimensional surface scans of the whole head in 70 infants, using stereophotogrammetric imaging technology, showed that helmeting produced a larger reduction in asymmetry than active repositioning that was most obvious in the occiput region. Whether this difference has any clinical importance is not yet known (Pediatrics 2010;126:e936-e45, doi:10.1542/peds.2009-1249).

Cannabis pipe smoking for chronic neuropathic pain was tested in a randomised controlled trial completed by 21 adults. Those who tried the highest potency (9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol) reported a significant improvement in pain relief, ability to fall asleep, and quality of sleep, but no differences in mood or quality of life. Common adverse events were headache, …

View Full Text

Sign in

Log in through your institution

Free trial

Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
Sign up for a free trial