Feature Christmas 2010: History

A shopping list of doctors

BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c5727 (Published 14 December 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c5727
  1. C John Scott, retired consultant physician
  1. 135 Ashgrove Road West, Aberdeen AB16 5BB, UK
  1. cjohnscott{at}aol.com

The season of dietary indulgence seems a good time to celebrate doctors whose names have become linked with items of food and drink. From antiquity to the present, doctors have attempted to influence the diet of their patients. Some have developed foods that became so popular that they have achieved lasting commercial success. Although many are forgotten as doctors, their names remain well known to the public, becoming famous brand names and trademarks.

Christopher Rawson Penfold (1811-70) and Henry John Lindeman (1811-81)

Doctors played a major role in the development of the Australian wine industry, and two remain as popular brands today: Penfolds and Lindeman’s.

Christopher Rawson Penfold1 studied medicine at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, graduating in 1838. For six years he practised medicine in Brighton, before emigrating to Australia in 1844 and settling close to Adelaide. He believed in the medicinal power of wine, particularly for the treatment of anaemia, and before he left Britain had obtained vine cuttings from France. In Australia he developed a successful medical practice and began to make wine. Originally this was intended for medicinal use, but demand understandably grew and soon his wine was being sold throughout the country. Although he reduced his clinical work as demands of the vineyards increased, he continued to practise some medicine until the year of his death. After his death, his wife, who had been involved in wine production from the beginning, took over the business. It has now become internationally successful.

Henry John Lindeman2 graduated from St Bartholomew’s Hospital in 1834 and became a naval surgeon. Dissatisfied with his prospects in the navy, he …

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