BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c5268 (Published 29 September 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c5268

Computers do it better than humans when it comes to taking a sexual history (Sexually Transmitted Infections 2010;86:310-4, doi:10.1136/sti.2010.043422). Interviews assisted by computer were compared with interviews conducted with paper and pen. The computers recorded more risky behaviour and generated more tests than traditional paper and pen interviews, although increased disclosure did not increase the number of diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections and computer assisted self interviews resulted in fewer HIV tests.

Habitual moderate and vigorous physical activity can attenuate arterial stiffening, but does it make a difference if you’re fit or unfit to start with, and what about light physical activity? Around 540 men and woman participated in this study, in which arterial stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Age related arterial stiffness was inversely related to daily time spent in doing light physical activity more obviously in older unfit people, but not so evident in those who were older but already fit (Hypertension 2010;56:540-6, doi:10.1161/hypertensionaha.110.156331).

The value of an object may be enhanced simply …

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