Letters Calcium and heart attacks

Authors’ reply

BMJ 2010; 341 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c4998 (Published 15 September 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c4998
  1. Mark J Bolland, senior research fellow1,
  2. Alison Avenell, clinical senior lecturer2,
  3. John A Baron, professor of medicine3,
  4. Andrew Grey, associate professor of medicine1,
  5. Ian R Reid, professor of medicine1,
  6. Graeme S MacLennan, senior research fellow2,
  7. Greg D Gamble, research fellow1
  1. 1Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92 019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
  2. 2Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD
  3. 3Departments of Medicine, and Community and Family Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
  1. i.reid{at}auckland.ac.nz

    As Dawson-Hughes and Heiss and colleagues suggest,1 2 our results are not generalisable to combined calcium and vitamin D treatment. Investigation of this treatment should be a high priority. In one large study in our meta-analysis the risks of myocardial infarction and stroke with calcium and vitamin D were similar to those with calcium alone.3 The WHI study reported no increase in cardiovascular risk in women randomised to calcium and vitamin D,4 but >50% of participants …

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