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Women in US academic medicine earn less than male peers

BMJ 2010; 340 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c1969 (Published 09 April 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1969
  1. Janice Hopkins Tanne
  1. 1New York

    A survey of nearly 3000 life science faculty members at the top 50 US medical schools has shown that women members earned just over $13 000 (£8500; €9700) less than their male counterparts with the equivalent career position and professional activity.

    There were no obvious reasons for the difference, concluded the study’s authors, from Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Brandeis University in Academic Medicine (2010;85:631-9, doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181d2b095).

    They write: “Despite increased national attention to gender inequalities in salary, women in the life sciences at all academic ranks, both PhDs and MDs, continued in 2007 to receive lower annual salaries than did their male …

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