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BMJ awards honour courage, determination, vision, and insight in medicine

BMJ 2010; 340 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c1450 (Published 12 March 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1450
  1. Nigel Hawkes
  1. 1London

    Health care wears many faces, and most of them were on display at the second annual BMJ Group Awards presentations at the Hilton on Park Lane on March 10. From clinical choices to patients’ voices, the awards seek to celebrate all that is best in the world of medicine.

    This year’s were bigger in all respects than the inaugural event in 2009: more entries, a huge vote of 40 000 BMJ readers for the Lifetime Achievement Award, and a larger venue to satisfy the demand for tickets. The common factor among the winners, diverse as they were, was leadership. They had all led in championing new ideas—in the laboratory, the clinic, the hospital, in education, communication and primary care, and in spreading those ideas more equitably across the world.

    Fiona Godlee, the BMJ’s editor, introduced the awards by expressing her delight at the quantity and quality of nominations—700 doctors or teams had been nominated for 11 awards. Professor Gordon Dickson, chief executive officer and secretary of the principal sponsor, MDDUS (the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland), said it was a night for celebration for everybody who worked every day in health care. His organisation’s sponsorship of the awards, he suggested modestly, might go some way to dispel the myth of the mean Scot.

    The writer and comedian Tony Hawks was the compère for the evening, remarking that he had once won an award himself. “I won junior musician of the year” he said. “It wasn’t such good news. He was a very irritating nine year old cellist.”

    The first category, Research Paper of the Year, went to researchers from the World Health Organization, led by Dr Melba Gomes, for a paper published in the Lancet showing that children with severe malaria unable to take oral treatment could be …

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