Obituaries

Harry Piggott

BMJ 2010; 340 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c1419 (Published 16 March 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1419
  1. Susanna Henley, Charles Piggott

    Harry Piggott was born in Kilburn, Derbyshire, in 1925. Educated at Herbert Strutt School in Belper he went on to study medicine at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He qualified from St Thomas’ Hospital in 1948, where he completed house jobs before national service in the Royal Army Medical Corps. As medical officer to the 16th and fifth Lancers he spent two years in Libya and Egypt. His memories of this time were lasting and vivid. On his return he started general surgical training but soon developed an interest in orthopaedics. He completed his training at the Middlesex and Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital and was appointed consultant to Selly Oak Hospital in 1963. After the retirement of Frances Allen in 1965 he was appointed to the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital and Birmingham Children’s Hospital. He made an important contribution to the management of scoliosis in the United Kingdom and to orthopaedic training in the West Midlands.

    After retirement in 1987, he retained an active interest in orthopaedics and developed a very successful medicolegal practice.

    He had a lifelong love of theatre, especially opera and Shakespeare, and enjoyed caravan touring through Europe with his wife, Doreen. His later years were largely devoted to looking after Doreen, who had dementia, but thanks to his care enjoyed an excellent quality of life. Eventually his mental and physical health deteriorated and they moved into care together in 2007.

    Predeceased by his wife of 60 years, Doreen; he leaves two children; and four grandchildren.

    Notes

    Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1419

    Footnotes

    • Former consultant orthopaedic surgeon Royal Orthopaedic Hospital and Birmingham Children’s Hospital (b 1925; q St Thomas’ Hospital 1948; FRCS), d 28 May 2009.

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