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Traditional Chinese practitioner breaches Medicine Act

BMJ 2010; 340 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c1028 (Published 19 February 2010) Cite this as: BMJ 2010;340:c1028
  1. Lynn Eaton
  1. 1London

    A traditional Chinese medicine practitioner has been given a two year conditional discharge after breaching the Medicines Act 1968 by prescribing a traditional medicine—one banned in the United Kingdom—which doctors believe caused irreversible damage to a patient’s health. The judge in the Old Bailey case decided, however, that the practitioner had not intentionally harmed the patient

    The product, Longdan Xie Gan Wan, was given for five years to a woman who had a skin complaint. Patricia Booth went on to have kidney failure, develop cancer, and have a heart attack. She now undergoes dialysis three times a week. Doctors have attributed these conditions to the Chinese medicine, which was taken orally.

    The legal action was brought by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. It discovered that the …

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