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Study suggests smokers are still misled by labelling of cigarette packs

BMJ 2009; 339 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b3623 (Published 07 September 2009) Cite this as: BMJ 2009;339:b3623
  1. Roger Dobson
  1. 1Abergavenny

    New research among UK adults and children shows that the use of words such as “smooth” on cigarette packs and lighter coloured packaging misleads people into thinking cigarettes are less harmful than other brands, suggesting that current regulations may be inadequate.

    More than half of adults and young people taking part in the study reported that cigarette brands labelled as “smooth” were less harmful to health than “regular” varieties, with, for example, 54% of children considering that the Mayfair Smooth brand of cigarettes was less harmful than Mayfair King Size (European Journal of Public Health, doi:10.1093/eurpub/ckp122).

    Regulations requiring the use of plain packaging—including removing colours from cigarette packs—and preventing the use of words such as “smooth,” “gold,” and …

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