Letters Shift work and cancer

Risk, compensation, challenges

BMJ 2009; 339 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b3430 (Published 25 August 2009) Cite this as: BMJ 2009;339:b3430
  1. Thomas C Erren, physician, epidemiologist1,
  2. Puran Falaturi, physician1,
  3. Peter Morfeld, epidemiologist1,
  4. Russel J Reiter, professor of neuroendocrinology2
  1. 1Institute and Policlinic for Occupational and Social Medicine, University of Cologne, 50924 Köln, Germany
  2. 2Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA
  1. tim.erren{at}uni-koeln.de

    The group 2A classification by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of shift work that entails circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic came—for many—as a surprise.1 Thereafter, with specific reference to IARC’s declaration, 38 women with breast cancer who had worked night shifts for at …

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