Letters Priorities in stroke care

The London stroke strategy

BMJ 2009; 338 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b2616 (Published 29 June 2009) Cite this as: BMJ 2009;338:b2616
  1. Nick Losseff, consultant neurologist and interim London clinical director for stroke1,
  2. Diane Ames, consultant stroke physician and joint North West Thames clinical lead for stroke1,
  3. Geoff Cloud, consultant stroke physician and South West Thames clinical lead for stroke1,
  4. Gill Cluckie, stroke clinical nurse specialist and South East Thames clinical lead for stroke1,
  5. Patrick Gompertz, consultant stroke physician and North East Thames clinical lead for stroke1,
  6. Binnie Grant, stroke coordinator and joint North West Thames clinical lead for stroke1,
  7. Hugh Markus, professor of neurology and clinical lead, South East England Stroke Research Network1,
  8. Martin M Brown, professor of stroke medicine and clinical lead, Thames Stroke Research Network1
  1. 1Portland House, London SW1
  1. nicholas.losseff{at}gmail.com

    Sudlow and Warlow assume that the benefits of the proposed hyperacute stroke units (HASUs) in London are limited to the delivery of thrombolysis.1 However, the aims are to provide all patients with stroke with emergency assessment from specialists in acute stroke, cost effective brain imaging,2 and a high dependency unit environment for physiological monitoring and active intervention. …

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